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Has eGain (EGAN) Outpaced Other Computer and Technology Stocks This Year?

Investors focused on the Computer and Technology space have likely heard of eGain (EGAN), but is the stock performing well in comparison to the rest of its sector peers? A quick glance at the company’s year-to-date performance in comparison to the rest of the Computer and Technology sector should help us answer this question.

eGain is one of 611 companies in the Computer and Technology group. The Computer and Technology group currently sits at #7 within the Zacks Sector Rank. The Zacks Sector Rank gauges the strength of our 16 individual sector groups by measuring the average Zacks Rank of the individual stocks within the groups.

The Zacks Rank emphasizes earnings estimates and estimate revisions to find stocks with improving earnings outlooks. This system has a long record of success, and these stocks tend to be on track to beat the market over the next one to three months. EGAN

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A Detailed Guide to CodeGuard Backups

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Backups are the lifeline of websites. In the online world, a website is one of the most important digital assets since it represents your business. Online threats like hackers, viruses, etc. are always on the hunt for sites with vulnerabilities. While most site owners deploy the latest security tools and take comprehensive measures to keep these attacks at bay, if one gets through, your site’s data can be at great risk. However, if you have a comprehensive backup process in place, then you can be assured of having the latest running version of your website on hand at all times. 

Most site owners think that the backups provided by their hosting server providers are sufficient and that they don’t need more backups. However, they are probably unaware of the fact that the hosting providers usually store backups on the same server as the original files. Hence, if the server experiences … Read More

Wary of big tech’s bottom line, activists greet facial recognition pledges with skepticism

Over the course of four days last week, three of America’s largest technology companies — IBM, Amazon and Microsoft — announced sweeping restrictions on their sale of facial recognition tools and called for federal regulation amid protests across the United States against police violence and racial profiling.

In terms of headlines, it was a symbolic shift for the industry. Researchers and civil liberties groups who have been calling for strict controls or outright bans on the technology for years are celebrating, although cautiously.

They doubt, however, that much has changed. The careful wording of the public pledges leaves plenty of room for oppressive uses of the technology, which exacerbate human biases and infringe on people’s constitutional freedoms, critics say.

“It shows that organizing and socially informed research works,” said Meredith Whittaker, co-founder of the AI Now Institute, which researches the social implications of artificial intelligence. “But do I

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Here’s why computer art will never replace human art

In December 1964, over a single evening session in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, John Coltrane and his quartet recorded the entirety of A Love Supreme. This jazz album is considered Coltrane’s masterpiece – the culmination of his spiritual awakening – and sold a million copies. What it represents is all too human: a climb out of addiction, a devotional quest, a paean to God.

Five decades later and 50 miles downstate, over 12 hours this April and fueled by Monster energy drinks in a spare bedroom in Princeton, New Jersey, Ji-Sung Kim wrote an algorithm to teach a computer to teach itself to play jazz. Kim, a 20-year-old Princeton sophomore, was in a rush – he had a quiz the next morning. The resulting neural network project, called deepjazz, trended on GitHub, generated a buzz of excitement and skepticism from the Hacker News commentariat, got 100,000 listens

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